Forum Jar
 
Forum Jar : Film Forum : Film Forum Daniel Felix de Weldon
See other topics in Film Forum

Film Forum
 
Important rules for using Film Forum
• No offensive words are allowed in this forum.
• To prevent spams, you must not use the words "http" ".com" or "/"(slashes) in this forum.
 

Alert! Please do not buy anything or pay anyone on this forum. Scammers have been reported on our forum. Please also do not go to any links posted on here. We have been reported about links to websites that contain viruses. Thank you.

 
Topic: Film Forum Daniel Felix de Weldon
Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "Daniel deWeldon, effectively contained, finds an arresting stillness, gorgeously performed. Deeply inhabited on a moment to moment basis, turbulently affecting and robust performance, real stakes, gorgeously conjure the sudden weightless astonishment, grace and guts" — Charlotte Stoudt (LA Times, NY Times, and Village Voice Top Critic)[3]

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "To its considerable credit, this production was deeply inhabited on a moment-to-moment basis... High-octane talent, de Weldon brought gritty authenticity...had me admiring the performances." — Charles McNulty (Chief LA Times Critic)[4]

LA Weekly Critic's Choice: "de Weldon sat staring into space playing out Shanley’s Apache dance with scrupulous honesty and attention to the details, unfolding in the ebbs and flows of real time... live-wire performance... was the art and craft of being... it matters because it's so rare when they get it so right, the authenticity of it in a world of fakery - a fleeting, sacred moment." — Steven Leigh Morris (Head Critic LA Weekly)[5]

Broadway World Review Critic's Choice: "Kudos go to Daniel de Weldon whose Father Braulio is the mark of a brilliant performance that enlists such an emotional response to a character... Some of the most dramatic and sensational moments I have witnessed on stage." — Shari Barrett[6]

NPR KCRW 89.9FM National Radio Broadcast Critic's Choice: "de Weldon makes Shanley's pungent, staccato dialogue believable... Wild." — James Taylor[7]

Back Stage West Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's performance is wonderfully layered. When he gives us a glimpse inside, the bear becomes a teddy bear." — Dave DePino

Showmag. com Critic's Choice: "'de Weldon is a reminder of Marlon Brando's Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire, convincing and memorable performance, with a deep wide void aching to be filled with humanity. " — Mary E. Montoro

LAStageScene. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon with a James Dean look and intensity creates and accomplishes the miraculous, he makes "Danny" heroic. de Weldon is member of the legendary Actors Studio and it shows." — Steven Stanley

ReviewPlays. com Critic's Choice: "Initially and damn effectively, de Weldon is a blunt force instrument, to borrow the phrase with which M labeled Daniel Craig’s newly minted 007 Bond. de Weldon's transformation was magnificent in his tentative attempts of intimacy and tenderness." — James Scarborough

Frontiers Magazine Critic's Choice: "de Weldon hit every level imaginable in David Rabe's Streamers."

Stagehappenings. com Critic's Choice: "Father Braulio of the Inquisition, effectively and menacingly portrayed by Daniel de Weldon. It was a tour de force performance with bouts of religious ecstasy and erotic fantasy." — Ellyse Cooke

KCLA RADIO Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's acting is wonderfully evocative of the time and place, the characters come alive, convincing portrait and brilliant acting."— Laurie Senit

LASplash. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's well portrayed, demanding performance that draws approving laughs from the empathetic audience." — M. Rutherford

The Ticket Stub Critic's Choice: "The power of Daniel de Weldon, to tap into the desparado that lives deep within many of us, looking for love and connection." — R. Goldberg

Examiner. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon is excellent in his role as the darkly and deeply evil Father Braulio." — Ron Irwin

LA City Beat Critic's Choice: "de Weldon takes over..." — Don Shirley
Industry Reviews

Lillian Muller, Playboy Magazine: "de Weldon as Father Braulio is pure power, sex appeal, and charisma. Masterfully and beautifully crafted work."

Ryan Cutrona, actor in 24, Mad Men, In the Line of Fire: "Daniel de Weldon shows us how horrific it is to be human, the terror of being alive and immeasurable wound and scar of life, and it's concomitant tolerance,

by NY TIMES ARCHIVE Fri Oct 02 03:37:44 UTC 2015

Lillian Muller, Playboy Magazine: "de Weldon as Father Braulio is pure power, sex appeal, and charisma. Masterfully and beautifully crafted work."

Ryan Cutrona, actor in 24, Mad Men, In the Line of Fire: "Daniel de Weldon shows us how horrific it is to be human, the terror of being alive and immeasurable wound and scar of life, and it's concomitant tolerance, constitution, will and perseverance, creation, monstrous, delicate and divine. Genesis, here only God can watch and learn."

Frances Fisher, actress in Unforgiven: de Weldon proves true to be an extremely gifted actor in A Muse of Fire.

Michael Arabian, director: "de Weldon's performance in the feature film Fortune's 500 is reminiscent of a young Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift."

Lyle Kessler, playwright of "Orphans": "Daniel de Weldon's magnificent performance far surpass any other interpretations of this terrific play, forceful and poetic. "Danny and The Deep Blue Sea"

Uta Hagen, actress in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?: "Daniel de Weldon is a gigantic talent, real star power in Lovers and Other Strangers."

Mark Rydell, director of The Rose, On Golden Pond, and James Dean: "Daniel de Weldon's Monumental is the best screenplay I have ever read."

Barbara Bain, actress in Mission: Impossible: "Daniel de Weldon's Monumental is the best script she has read in the last 20 years."

Armand Assante, actor in Gotti: "Daniel de Weldon's Monumental is the perfect hero's journey in mythological storytelling and it's potential cinematically is scale in proportion to Felix de Weldon's legacy."

Martin Landau, actor in Ed Wood: " de Weldon's Monumental is an epic story that deeply moved me."

Lionsgate Films grade de Weldon's performance as lead antagonist P. Terrence Pecker in Fortune's 500 with A+ across the boards.

Howard Fine director, "I am a huge, huge fan of Daniel de Weldon as an actor."
References

by guest Tue Oct 06 17:43:51 UTC 2015

The theater is quite dark when we enter, and filled with artificial smoke, only
slightly illuminated by a dim blue light reflected in the haze. We see two small
round bar tables several yards apart on the stage, and nothing else.
Otherworldly, aquatic-sounding music plays in the background. Since the pre-
show announcements have already been made as we waited in the lobby,
there is no other sound to break the mood. Then, suddenly, the theater is
plunged into total darkness. A match is lit on stage, and then a candle in a
round red jar illuminates a woman’s face. She is smoking. The lights come up,
two stark spots shining directly from stage left. A man enters with a pitcher of
beer and a beer glass. He starts to fill the glass, then pours the beer over his
hands instead, the beer spilling on the floor. We know that are definitely in for
something different tonight.

Danny is a violent man with a dark soul. “I think I killed this guy last night,” he
tells Roberta. “Everything hurts and the only time it stops is when I’m hitting on
somebody.” Danny is just 29, but says he wants to die when he turns 30. He is
known as “the Beast.”

Roberta is 31, and equally lost. Pregnant at 18, she has a screwed-up 13-year-
old son and layers of guilt from arelationship that torments her
still. Though she is still living with her parents, she tells Danny “You got no home,
just like me.”

What starts out as verbal sparring between a man and a woman in a bar
develops into something much more after they return to Roberta’s room and
make love. Danny and the Deep Blue Sea transforms before our eyes into one
of the most powerful and suspenseful love stories I’ve seen. At first, Danny and
Roberta almost repel us. They’re the kind of people we avert our eyes from if
we happen to walk past them. By the end of the play, we have become so
invested in their salvation that we are leaning forward, on the edge of our
seats, praying for these two losers to find deliverance in each other’s arms. This
is very powerful stuff indeed.

For Danny and the Deep Blue Sea to work, it must have two consummate
actors in the starring roles, and this production most certainly does. Deborah
Dir and Daniel De Weldon are both members of the legendary Actors’ Studio,
and it shows. Dir creates a rough, even vulgar Roberta, which makes her
reluctant softening all the more powerful. In her heavy New York accent and
with her eyes showing many layers of pain (“Don’t touch me. It burns,” she tells
Danny), Dir commands the stage with an electric presence. De Weldon is
every bit her equal. With a James Dean look and intensity, he creates a Danny
whose violence is a defense against loneliness, and as his hardness begins to
melt, De Weldon accomplishes the miraculous. He makes Danny heroic. We
are rooting, even praying for him not to give up on Roberta. I haven’t felt this
much suspense in a theater since Twelve Angry Men.

Michael Arabian’s direction is nothing short of brilliant. This is clearly a director
with a vision, and it shows in his many directorial choices. He is aided by some
of the finest set, lighting, and sound design you’ll see in L.A. theater. I loved
the “deep blue sea” motifs of Max Maksimovic’s Roberta’s messy bedroom
set. The walls are cut to resemble a large sea shell, and there’s a fishing net
hanging above her bed. Frank McKown and Joe Fusco’s magnificent lighting
of the first act has already been described. In Act 2, it is equally fine—at first,
the dimly lit lovemaking, and a later scene where the lights fade to black with
only a single candle burning in the dark. The background music is loud and
striking, evoking both the sea metaphor and the violence of the two
characters.

This is a production that makes a theatergoer proud to call L.A. his home. That
audiences have flocked to the t

by guest Thu Oct 08 19:06:26 UTC 2015

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "Daniel deWeldon, effectively contained, finds an arresting stillness, gorgeously performed. Deeply inhabited on a moment to moment basis, turbulently affecting and robust performance, real stakes, gorgeously conjure the sudden weightless astonishment, grace and guts" — Charlotte Stoudt (LA Times, NY Times, and Village Voice Top Critic)[3]

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "To its considerable credit, this production was deeply inhabited on a moment-to-moment basis... High-octane talent, de Weldon brought gritty authenticity...had me admiring the performances." — Charles McNulty (Chief LA Times Critic)[4]

LA Weekly Critic's Choice: "de Weldon sat staring into space playing out Shanley’s Apache dance with scrupulous honesty and attention to the details, unfolding in the ebbs and flows of real time... live-wire performance... was the art and craft of being... it matters because it's so rare when they get it so right, the authenticity of it in a world of fakery - a fleeting, sacred moment." — Steven Leigh Morris (Head Critic LA Weekly)[5]

Broadway World Review Critic's Choice: "Kudos go to Daniel de Weldon whose Father Braulio is the mark of a brilliant performance that enlists such an emotional response to a character... Some of the most dramatic and sensational moments I have witnessed on stage." — Shari Barrett[6]

NPR KCRW 89.9FM National Radio Broadcast Critic's Choice: "de Weldon makes Shanley's pungent, staccato dialogue believable... Wild." — James Taylor[7]

Back Stage West Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's performance is wonderfully layered. When he gives us a glimpse inside, the bear becomes a teddy bear." — Dave DePino

Showmag. com Critic's Choice: "'de Weldon is a reminder of Marlon Brando's Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire, convincing and memorable performance, with a deep wide void aching to be filled with humanity. " — Mary E. Montoro

LAStageScene. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon with a James Dean look and intensity creates and accomplishes the miraculous, he makes "Danny" heroic. de Weldon is member of the legendary Actors Studio and it shows." — Steven Stanley

ReviewPlays. com Critic's Choice: "Initially and damn effectively, de Weldon is a blunt force instrument, to borrow the phrase with which M labeled Daniel Craig’s newly minted 007 Bond. de Weldon's transformation was magnificent in his tentative attempts of intimacy and tenderness." — James Scarborough

Frontiers Magazine Critic's Choice: "de Weldon hit every level imaginable in David Rabe's Streamers."

Stagehappenings. com Critic's Choice: "Father Braulio of the Inquisition, effectively and menacingly portrayed by Daniel de Weldon. It was a tour de force performance with bouts of religious ecstasy and erotic fantasy." — Ellyse Cooke

KCLA RADIO Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's acting is wonderfully evocative of the time and place, the characters come alive, convincing portrait and brilliant acting."— Laurie Senit

LASplash. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's well portrayed, demanding performance that draws approving laughs from the empathetic audience." — M. Rutherford

The Ticket Stub Critic's Choice: "The power of Daniel de Weldon, to tap into the desparado that lives deep within many of us, looking for love and connection." — R. Goldberg

Examiner. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon is excellent in his role as the darkly and deeply evil Father Braulio." — Ron Irwin

LA City Beat Critic's Choice: "de Weldon takes over..." — Don Shirley
Industry Reviews

Lillian Muller, Playboy Magazine: "de Weldon as Father Braulio is pure power, sex appeal, and charisma. Masterfully and beautifully crafted work."

Ryan Cutrona, actor in 24, Mad Men, In the Line of Fire: "Daniel de Weldon shows us how horrific it is to be human, the terror of being alive and immeasurable wound and scar of lif

by LA TIMES Archive Sun Oct 11 15:06:27 UTC 2015

Incredible reviews

by guest Mon Oct 12 22:37:58 UTC 2015

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "Daniel deWeldon, effectively contained, finds an arresting stillness, gorgeously performed. Deeply inhabited on a moment to moment basis, turbulently affecting and robust performance, real stakes, gorgeously conjure the sudden weightless astonishment, grace and guts" — Charlotte Stoudt (LA Times, NY Times, and Village Voice Top Critic)[3]

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "To its considerable credit, this production was deeply inhabited on a moment-to-moment basis... High-octane talent, de Weldon brought gritty authenticity...had me admiring the performances." — Charles McNulty (Chief LA Times Critic)[4]

LA Weekly Critic's Choice: "de Weldon sat staring into space playing out Shanley’s Apache dance with scrupulous honesty and attention to the details, unfolding in the ebbs and flows of real time... live-wire performance... was the art and craft of being... it matters because it's so rare when they get it so right, the authenticity of it in a world of fakery - a fleeting, sacred moment." — Steven Leigh Morris (Head Critic LA Weekly)[5]

Broadway World Review Critic's Choice: "Kudos go to Daniel de Weldon whose Father Braulio is the mark of a brilliant performance that enlists such an emotional response to a character... Some of the most dramatic and sensational moments I have witnessed on stage." — Shari Barrett[6]

NPR KCRW 89.9FM National Radio Broadcast Critic's Choice: "de Weldon makes Shanley's pungent, staccato dialogue believable... Wild." — James Taylor[7]

Los Angeles Downtown News Critic's Choice: "de Weldon miraculously transformed and embodied Aaron McKinney in The Laramie Project:10 Years Later." — D. Johnson

Back Stage West Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's performance is wonderfully layered. When he gives us a glimpse inside, the bear becomes a teddy bear." — Dave DePino

Showmag. com Critic's Choice: "'de Weldon is a reminder of Marlon Brando's Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire, convincing and memorable performance, with a deep wide void aching to be filled with humanity. " — Mary E. Montoro

LAStageScene. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon with a James Dean look and intensity creates and accomplishes the miraculous, he makes "Danny" heroic. de Weldon is member of the legendary Actors Studio and it shows." — Steven Stanley

ReviewPlays. com Critic's Choice: "Initially and damn effectively, de Weldon is a blunt force instrument, to borrow the phrase with which M labeled Daniel Craig’s newly minted 007 Bond. de Weldon's transformation was magnificent in his tentative attempts of intimacy and tenderness." — James Scarborough

Frontiers Magazine Critic's Choice: "de Weldon hit every level imaginable in David Rabe's Streamers."

Stagehappenings. com Critic's Choice: "Father Braulio of the Inquisition, effectively and menacingly portrayed by Daniel de Weldon. It was a tour de force performance with bouts of religious ecstasy and erotic fantasy." — Ellyse Cooke

KCLA RADIO Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's acting is wonderfully evocative of the time and place, the characters come alive, convincing portrait and brilliant acting."— Laurie Senit

LASplash. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's well portrayed, demanding performance that draws approving laughs from the empathetic audience." — M. Rutherford

The Ticket Stub Critic's Choice: "The power of Daniel de Weldon, to tap into the desparado that lives deep within many of us, looking for love and connection." — R. Goldberg

Examiner. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon is excellent in his role as the darkly and deeply evil Father Braulio." — Ron Irwin

LA City Beat Critic's Choice: "de Weldon takes over..." — Don Shirley
Industry Reviews

Lillian Muller, Playboy Magazine: "de Weldon as Father Braulio is pure power, sex appeal, and charisma. Masterfully and beautifully crafted work."

Ryan Cutron

by guest Tue Oct 13 02:58:13 UTC 2015

FATHER OF DANIEL FELIX DEWELDON: SIR FELIX DEWELDON

Felix Weihs de Weldon (April 12, 1907 – June 3, 2003) was an Austrian-born American sculptor. His most famous pieces include the United States Marine Corps War Memorial (Iwo Jima Memorial, 1954) in Arlington County, Virginia and the Malaysian National Monument (1966) in Kuala Lumpur.
Biography

Felix de Weldon was born in Vienna, Austria-Hungary on April 12, 1907. He received his early education at St. Egichin's Grammar School. In 1925, he earned an A.B. from Marchetti College,[1] a preparatory college.[2] From the University of Vienna's Academy of Creative Arts and School of Architecture, he earned his M.A. and M.S. degrees in 1927 and his PhD in 1929.

De Weldon first received notice as a sculptor at the age of 17, with his statue of Austrian educator and diplomat Professor Ludo Hartman.[1] In the 1920s, he joined artist's communes in France, Italy and Spain. De Weldon eventually moved to London, where he gained a number of commissions, among them a portrait sculpture of George V.

A consequential trip to Canada to sculpt Prime Minister Mackenzie King brought De Weldon to North America. He settled in the United States in 1937. De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy during World War II and was discharged with the rank of Painter Second Class (PTR 2).[2] He became a United States citizen in 1945.[1]

In 1950, President Harry Truman appointed de Weldon to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts.[3] In 1956, he was re-appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, and again in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy. In 1959, he received an honorary knighthood for his service to the British Crown.

In 1951, De Weldon acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate in Newport, Rhode Island, where he lived until 1996, when he lost the property and most of his assets to financial hardship.

Felix de Weldon died on June 3, 2003 at the age of 96, in Woodstock, Virginia and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. De Weldon is survived by his wife, Joyce Swetland de Weldon of Warwick, Rhode Island and two sons Byron and Daniel DeWeldon. Daniel is collaborating with Allen Nalasco on a biopic of his father's life titled "DeWeldon - The Man Behind The Monuments". Daniel will play the part of Felix during the height of his career.
Work
Approximately 1,200 de Weldon sculptures are located on seven continents. (A de Weldon monument of Richard Byrd is on McMurdo Sound, in Antarctica).
At the conclusion of the war in 1945, the Congress of the United

title Tan Sri, the Malaysian equivalent of a high-ranking knighthood.
Partial list of public sculpture

1923 - Marine Monument ("Iron Mike"), Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial, Belleau Wood, France
1935 - King George V, National Portrait Gallery, London, UK
1936 - King Edward VIII coronation bust, London, UK
1936 - King George VI coronation bust, London, UK
1938 - Prime Minister Mackenzie King - Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada
1938 - Agnes Campbell Macphail - Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada
1938 - Senator Cairine Wilson - Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada
1945 - George Washington, United States Embassy, Canberra, Australia
1948 - Simon Bolivar Monument, Bolivar, WV
1948 - President Harry S. Truman bust - Truman Library, Independence, MO
1949 - George Bannerman Dealey statue, Dealey Plaza, Dallas, TX
1949 - Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD
1949 - Secretary of the United States Senate Leslie Biffle, Main Post Office, Piggott, AR
1949 - John Steelman, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
1954 - Raising of the Flag on Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima Memorial, Roslyn, VA (original model 1946)
1954 - John Marshall bust, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
1954 - Sir William Blackstone bust, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
1954 - George Wythe bust, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
1959 - Equestrian Statue of Simo

by guest Thu Oct 15 04:31:14 UTC 2015

Daniel Felix de Weldon is an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer. de Weldon is a native of Washington, D.C. and Newport, Rhode Island. He is the son of sculptor Felix de Weldon, known for the Marine Corps War Memorial statue of the flag raising at Iwo Jima, official United States Presidential busts of John F. Kennedy and President Harry S. Truman.
After completing a six-year masters program in Theatrical Arts under Uta Hagen and Howard Fine, de Weldon presented himself to the Actors Studio and garnered the title of Lifetime Member under Al Pacino, Lou Antonio, Barbara Bain, Martin Landau, Mark Rydell, Ellen Burstyn, and Harvey Keitel.
de Weldon has been honored with over 30 top Critics' Choice and featured on NPR for outstanding acting performance.[1] Notable published reviews have likened his performances to Marlon Brando, James Dean, and Daniel Craig.[2]

Theatre
de Weldon's theatrical debut was in the 1999 Los Angeles production of David Rabe's Streamers, receiving the Los Angeles Times Critics' Choice. de Weldon went on to produce, direct and star in the 2003 LA production of Edward Albees’ The Zoo Story garnering the Los Angeles Times "Best LA Theater" by audience recognition.
In 2006, he starred opposite Charles Dierkop in The Actors Studio presentation of Death of a Salesman. In 2007 de Weldon then produced and starred in the Los Angeles play, Danny and The Deep Blue Sea with Deborah Dir.[3] This revival of the classic John Patrick Shanley play ran for eight months and received 15 acclaimed Critics' Choice. At the 29th Annual LA Weekly Theater Awards Danny and The Deep Blue Sea was nominated for Best Two-Person Show and Best Production Design.[4]
In 2009, de Weldon starred opposite three time Emmy Award winning actress Barbara Bain in The Laramie Project:Ten Years Later at Grand Performances in Los Angeles, hosted by Glenn Close presented world-wide in 150 cities by satellite.
de Weldon starred as the lead man opposite Frances Fisher in the 2013 production of A Muse of Fire.[5]

Film
On the screen, de Weldon's feature film credits include: Select Fit (2004) and The Bill (dir. Daniel Roemer); Project Greenlight Official Selection, On The Lot finalist (actor) producer- Steven Spielberg, LA Shorts Fest Official Selection, top five finalist for best film ($1 million prize).
HeadHunting, Inc. (2005) (dir. Pat Ortman); The Night Before The Morning After (2006) and Friendly Fire (2008); From The Ashes (2009); Black Angel (2011); Fortune's 500 (2012); (dir. Max Maksimovic); Kansas City Film Fest Official Selection; Amsterdam (2015) (dir. Ron Fernandez).

Currently, de Weldon is starring in the 2015 feature film The Custodian.
Daniel de Weldon has taken on the role of film producer through his company Volition Entertainment Productions. The first film, The Elephant Ride stars de Weldon and is based on a true story. Currently attached to the project are producer David Hillary (Deviant films), Michael Arabian, Oscar award winner Martin Landau, Grammy award winner SEAL, Emmy award winner Armand Assante, and Wolfgang Hatz, aka Audi's "Mr. Engine".
Also in development is the biopic based on the life of Daniel's father Felix de Weldon, titled Monumental. The film encapsulates his life and career as an artist. Daniel de Weldon is collaborating on the script with Allen Nalasco, and is slated to play the role of his father during the height of his career.

Daniel Felix de Weldon Critical Acclaim

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "de Weldon, effectively contained, finds an arresting stillness, gorgeously performed. Deeply inhabited on a moment to moment basis, turbulently affecting and robust performance, real stakes, gorgeously conjure the sudden weightless astonishment, grace and guts" - Charlotte Stoudt (LA Times, NY Times, and Village Voice Top Critic)

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "To its considerable credit, this production was deeply inhabited on a moment-to-moment basis... High-octane talent, de Weldo

by Wikipedia Sun Feb 28 01:01:28 UTC 2016

Daniel Felix de Weldon is an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer. de Weldon is a native of Washington, D.C. and Newport, Rhode Island. He is the son of sculptor Felix de Weldon, known for the Marine Corps War Memorial statue of the flag raising at Iwo Jima, official United States Presidential busts of John F. Kennedy and President Harry S. Truman.
After completing a six-year masters program in Theatrical Arts under Uta Hagen and Howard Fine, de Weldon presented himself to the Actors Studio and garnered the title of Lifetime Member under Al Pacino, Lou Antonio, Barbara Bain, Martin Landau, Mark Rydell, Ellen Burstyn, and Harvey Keitel.
de Weldon has been honored with over 30 top Critics' Choice and featured on NPR for outstanding acting performance.[1] Notable published reviews have likened his performances to Marlon Brando, James Dean, and Daniel Craig.[2]

Theatre
de Weldon's theatrical debut was in the 1999 Los Angeles production of David Rabe's Streamers, receiving the Los Angeles Times Critics' Choice. de Weldon went on to produce, direct and star in the 2003 LA production of Edward Albees’ The Zoo Story garnering the Los Angeles Times "Best LA Theater" by audience recognition.
In 2006, he starred opposite Charles Dierkop in The Actors Studio presentation of Death of a Salesman. In 2007 de Weldon then produced and starred in the Los Angeles play, Danny and The Deep Blue Sea with Deborah Dir.[3] This revival of the classic John Patrick Shanley play ran for eight months and received 15 acclaimed Critics' Choice. At the 29th Annual LA Weekly Theater Awards Danny and The Deep Blue Sea was nominated for Best Two-Person Show and Best Production Design.[4]
In 2009, de Weldon starred opposite three time Emmy Award winning actress Barbara Bain in The Laramie Project:Ten Years Later at Grand Performances in Los Angeles, hosted by Glenn Close presented world-wide in 150 cities by satellite.
de Weldon starred as the lead man opposite Frances Fisher in the 2013 production of A Muse of Fire.[5]

Film
On the screen, de Weldon's feature film credits include: Select Fit (2004) and The Bill (dir. Daniel Roemer); Project Greenlight Official Selection, On The Lot finalist (actor) producer- Steven Spielberg, LA Shorts Fest Official Selection, top five finalist for best film ($1 million prize).
HeadHunting, Inc. (2005) (dir. Pat Ortman); The Night Before The Morning After (2006) and Friendly Fire (2008); From The Ashes (2009); Black Angel (2011); Fortune's 500 (2012); (dir. Max Maksimovic); Kansas City Film Fest Official Selection; Amsterdam (2015) (dir. Ron Fernandez).

Currently, de Weldon is starring in the 2015 feature film The Custodian.
Daniel de Weldon has taken on the role of film producer through his company Volition Entertainment Productions. The first film, The Elephant Ride stars de Weldon and is based on a true story. Currently attached to the project are producer David Hillary (Deviant films), Michael Arabian, Oscar award winner Martin Landau, Grammy award winner SEAL, Emmy award winner Armand Assante, and Wolfgang Hatz, aka Audi's "Mr. Engine".
Also in development is the biopic based on the life of Daniel's father Felix de Weldon, titled Monumental. The film encapsulates his life and career as an artist. Daniel de Weldon is collaborating on the script with Allen Nalasco, and is slated to play the role of his father during the height of his career.

Daniel Felix de Weldon Critical Acclaim

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "de Weldon, effectively contained, finds an arresting stillness, gorgeously performed. Deeply inhabited on a moment to moment basis, turbulently affecting and robust performance, real stakes, gorgeously conjure the sudden weightless astonishment, grace and guts" - Charlotte Stoudt (LA Times, NY Times, and Village Voice Top Critic)

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "To its considerable credit, this production was deeply inhabited on a moment-to-moment basis... High-octane talent, de Weldo

by Wikipedia Sun Feb 28 18:58:43 UTC 2016

ЯЯ

by яЯ Mon Nov 14 22:45:05 UTC 2016


by Fri Dec 08 03:47:32 UTC 2017
 
Post a new comment
 
Message:

Name (optional):


By posting a comment, you indicate that you have agreed to our terms of use.

Feel adventurous? Check out random forums on Forum Jar!
Related Forums
Movie (disambiguation) Forum
Moving Pictures Forum
Film (disambiguation) Forum
African cinema Forum
Asian cinema Forum
European cinema Forum
Latin American cinema Forum
North American cinema Forum
Oceanian cinema Forum
Art Forum
Film industry Forum
Recording Forum
Camera Forum
Animation Forum
Special effect Forum
Cultural artifact Forum
Culture Forum
Documentary film Forum
Propaganda Forum
Dubbing (filmmaking) Forum
Subtitles Forum
Translation Forum
Film frame Forum
Persistence of vision Forum
Beta movement Forum
Photographic film Forum
Film stock Forum
Recording medium Forum
Play (theatre) Forum
Dances Forum
Script (performing arts) Forum
Set construction Forum
Costumes Forum
Direction Forum
Actors Forum
Audiences Forum
Storyboards Forum
Scores Forum
Mise en scene Forum
Camera obscura Forum
Alhazen Forum
Book of Optics Forum
Giambattista della Porta Forum
Lens Forum
Zoetrope Forum
Mutoscope Forum
Praxinoscope Forum
Magic lantern Forum
Celluloid Forum
Photography Forum
Eadweard Muybridge Forum


sponsored links: free polls | free chat rooms (weirdtown chat) | widgets for myspace | make chat room | free chat room list | review websites | snowboard or ski | chat vocab

terms of use | privacy policy
©2011 forumjar.com All rights reserved.