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Topic: Daniel DeWeldon Movie Forum
Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "Daniel deWeldon, effectively contained, finds an arresting stillness, gorgeously performed. Deeply inhabited on a moment to moment basis, turbulently affecting and robust performance, real stakes, gorgeously conjure the sudden weightless astonishment, grace and guts" — Charlotte Stoudt (LA Times, NY Times, and Village Voice Top Critic)[3]

Los Angeles Times Critic's Choice: "To its considerable credit, this production was deeply inhabited on a moment-to-moment basis... High-octane talent, de Weldon brought gritty authenticity...had me admiring the performances." — Charles McNulty (Chief LA Times Critic)[4]

LA Weekly Critic's Choice: "de Weldon sat staring into space playing out Shanley’s Apache dance with scrupulous honesty and attention to the details, unfolding in the ebbs and flows of real time... live-wire performance... was the art and craft of being... it matters because it's so rare when they get it so right, the authenticity of it in a world of fakery - a fleeting, sacred moment." — Steven Leigh Morris (Head Critic LA Weekly)[5]
States commissioned de Weldon to construct the statue for the Marine Corps War Memorial in the realist tradition, based upon the famous photograph of Joe Rosenthal, of the Associated Press agency, taken on February 23, 1945. De Weldon made sculptures from life of three of the six servicemen raising the United States flag on Mount Suribachi, on Iwo Jima. The other three flag-raisers who were killed in action later on the island were sculpted from photographs. De Weldon took nine years to make the memorial which was dedicated on November 10, 1954, and was assisted by hundreds of other sculptors. The result is the 100-ton bronze statue which is on display in Arlington, Virginia.
De Weldon also contributed in creating Malaysia's Tugu Negara (National Monument) when the country's first Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman saw the Marine Corps War Memorial statue in his visit to America in October 1960 and personally met him for favour to design the monument. De Weldon was later conferred with the


Broadway World Review Critic's Choice: "Kudos go to Daniel de Weldon whose Father Braulio is the mark of a brilliant performance that enlists such an emotional response to a character... Some of the most dramatic and sensational moments I have witnessed on stage." — Shari Barrett[6]

NPR KCRW 89.9FM National Radio Broadcast Critic's Choice: "de Weldon makes Shanley's pungent, staccato dialogue believable... Wild." — James Taylor[7]

Los Angeles Downtown News Critic's Choice: "de Weldon miraculously transformed and embodied Aaron McKinney in The Laramie Project:10 Years Later." — D. Johnson

Back Stage West Critic's Choice: "de Weldon's performance is wonderfully layered. When he gives us a glimpse inside, the bear becomes a teddy bear." — Dave DePino

Showmag. com Critic's Choice: "'de Weldon is a reminder of Marlon Brando's Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire, convincing and memorable performance, with a deep wide void aching to be filled with humanity. " — Mary E. Montoro

LAStageScene. com Critic's Choice: "de Weldon with a James Dean look and intensity creates and accomplishes the miraculous, he makes "Danny" heroic. de Weldon is member of the legendary Actors Studio and it shows." — Steven Stanley

ReviewPlays. com Critic's Choice: "Initially and damn effectively, de Weldon is a blunt force instrument, to borrow the phrase with which M labeled Daniel Craig’s newly minted 007 Bond. de Weldon's transformation was magnificent in his tentative attempts of intimacy and tenderness." — James Scarborough

Frontiers Magazine Critic's Choice: "de Weldon hit every level imaginable in David Rabe's Streamers."

Stagehappenings. com Critic's Choice: "Father Braulio of the Inquisition, effectively and menacingly portrayed by Daniel de Weldon. It was a tour de force performance

by guest Thu Oct 15 03:57:55 UTC 2015

Felix Weihs de Weldon (April 12, 1907 – June 3, 2003) was an Austrian-born American sculptor. His most famous pieces include the United States Marine Corps War Memorial (Iwo Jima Memorial, 1954) in Arlington County, Virginia and the Malaysian National Monument (1966) in Kuala Lumpur.
Biography
Felix de Weldon was born in Vienna, Austria-Hungary on April 12, 1907. He received his early education at St. Egichin's Grammar School. In 1925, he earned an A.B. from Marchetti College,[1] a preparatory college.[2] From the University of Vienna's Academy of Creative Arts and School of Architecture, he earned his M.A. and M.S. degrees in 1927 and his PhD in 1929.
De Weldon first received notice as a sculptor at the age of 17, with his statue of Austrian educator and diplomat Professor Ludo Hartman.[1] In the 1920s, he joined artist's communes in France, Italy and Spain. De Weldon eventually moved to London, where he gained a number of commissions, among them a portrait sculpture of George V.
A consequential trip to Canada to sculpt Prime Minister Mackenzie King brought De Weldon to North America. He settled in the United States in 1937. De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy during World War II and was discharged with the rank of Painter Second Class (PTR 2).[2] He became a United States citizen in 1945.[1]
In 1950, President Harry Truman appointed de Weldon to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts.[3] In 1956, he was re-appointed by President Dwight Eisenhower, and again in 1961 by President John F. Kennedy. In 1959, he received an honorary knighthood for his service to the British Crown.
In 1951, De Weldon acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate in Newport, Rhode Island, where he lived until 1996 when he lost the property and most of his assets to financial hardship.
Felix de Weldon died on June 3, 2003 at the age of 96, in Woodstock, Virginia and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. de Weldon is survived by his son Daniel DeWeldon. Daniel is collaborating with Allen Nalasco on a biopic of his father's life titled "De Weldon - The Man Behind The Monuments". Daniel will play the part of Felix during the height of his career.
Work

Bronze of Senator Bob Bartlett in the National Statuary Hall
Approximately 1,200 de Weldon sculptures are located on seven continents. (A de Weldon monument of Richard Byrd is on McMurdo Sound, in Antarctica).
At the conclusion of the war in 1945, the Congress of the United States commissioned de Weldon to construct the statue for the Marine Corps War Memorial in the realist tradition, based upon the famous photograph of Joe Rosenthal, of the Associated Press agency, taken on February 23, 1945. De Weldon made sculptures from life of three of the six servicemen raising the United States flag on Mount Suribachi, on Iwo Jima. The other three flag-raisers who were killed in action later on the island were sculpted from photographs. De Weldon took nine years to make the memorial which was dedicated on November 10, 1954, and was assisted by hundreds of other sculptors. The result is the 100-ton bronze statue which is on display in Arlington, Virginia.
De Weldon also contributed in creating Malaysia's Tugu Negara (National Monument) when the country's first Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman saw the Marine Corps War Memorial statue in his visit to America in October 1960 and personally met him for favour to design the monument. De Weldon was later conferred with the title Tan Sri, the Malaysian equivalent of a high-ranking knighthood.

Partial list of public sculpture
1935 - King George V, National Portrait Gallery, London, UK
1936 - King Edward VIII coronation bust, London, UK
1936 - King George VI coronation bust, London, UK
1938 - Prime Minister Mackenzie King - Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada
1938 - Agnes Campbell Macphail - Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada
1938 - Senator Cairine Wilson - Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada
1945 - George Washington, United States Embassy, Canberra, Australia
1948 - Simo

by Wikipedia Sun Feb 28 07:32:06 UTC 2016
 
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